Exhibit @ OU-Tulsa Schusterman Library!

Here is an ongoing exhibit (until January 2, 2015) that is on display in the gallery space at the OU-Tulsa Schusteman Library.  Surviving & Thriving: Aids, Politics, and Culture.  Make your plans to visit today!Surviving and Thriving Exhibition PosterPosted by Tom R.

 

Here’s to Libraries, Number Eleven!

MelkMonasteryLibrary-AustriaI realize it has been a while since I posted a library in this series, so here goes. This week we visit another monastery — the Melk Monastery, a Benedictine monastery situated on the Danube River in Austria.  The actual abbey was founded in 1089.  In the 12th century, a monastic school was founded and with it, a library that became renown for its extensive medieval manuscript collection.   The abbey contains the tomb of Saint Coloman of Stockerau as well as the remains of several members of the House of Babenberg (Austria’s first ruling dynasty).

“We may sit in our library and yet be in all quarters of the earth.”  (John Lubbock)

Source: photo courtesy of danieldalton.me  (BuzzFeed).

Posted by Tom R.

Why You Should Talk to the Librarian!

Paula Krebs, the Dean for the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Bridgewater State University, wrote this wonderful guest post on Vitae, the online career hub at the Chronicle of Higher Education.     As stated on their website, “the Chronicle is launching Vitae, which offers free career management tools, a powerful community, and the candid insights that academics need to build successful careers and fulfill their mission.”

In her post she basically addresses the notion of moving beyond the classroom when thinking about student success.  She highlights librarians, academic advisors, student affairs staff, the registrar, financial aid, veteran’s affairs, institutional research, etc., as groups that faculty members should get out of their offices and network with on a regular basis.

Here’s a link to the full post: https://chroniclevitae.com/news/673-why-you-should-talk-to-the-librarians

Posted by Tom R.

ADA Compliance and Online Instruction!

Mark your calendar for Friday, September 26, 2014!

It’s all about inclusion!  If you are teaching online, or you work in a school or business with a web presence, accessibility issues affect your students, colleagues, and customers.

If you have not already registered, there is still time to sign up for this low-cost, one-day program on ADA Compliance and Online Instruction hosted by the Oklahoma Chapter of the Special Libraries Association:

Where:             University of Central Oklahoma, Nigh University Center

When:              Friday, September 26, 2014
                                    8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Cost:                $30 (SLA member), $45 (non-SLA member)  $10 (student)

Lunch will be provided

Registration with credit card is now open:

https://www.regonline.com/OKSLA-ADASeminar2014

Deborah Thompson
2014-15 President
Oklahoma Chapter, Special Libraries Association

Questions?  Contact Tom Rink, x6457 or rink@nsuok.edu

Tentative Agenda
8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Arrival and Registration
9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Intro to Technology Accessibility
(Rob Carr, Accessibility Coordinator, ABLE Tech)
10:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. Refreshment Break
10:15 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Assistive Technology Introduction & Demo
11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Lunch (provided on site)
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Universal Design for Learning
(Jerol Skinner, Northeastern State University)
2:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Accessible Instructional Learning
(Rick Shelton, Northeastern State University)
2:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. Refreshment Break
2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. Panel Discussion (Speakers and students)
3:45 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Wrap-up

Posted by Tom R.

 

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Today in Irish History – 21 August: Birth of the Word “Quiz” in 1791

Dia dhaoibh ar mardin (Good morning)  Here are some interesting tidbits throughout Irish History that took place on August 21st.

1693 – Death of Patrick Sarsfield (b. in Lucan), created the first Earl of Lucan, Irish Jacobite and soldier, belonged to an Anglo-Norman family long settled in Ireland. His father Patrick Sarsfield married Anne, daughter of Rory (Roger) O’Moore, who organised the Irish Rebellion of 1641. The family was of Norman origin (by this time, known as “Old English”) and possessed an estate with an income of £2000 a year. Patrick, who was a younger son, entered Dongan’s Regiment of Foot on 6 February 1678.

1791 – Birth of the word ‘quiz’ (allegedly and disputed). Richard Daly, a theatre proprietor in Dublin, makes a bet that within 48 hours he can introduce a new word into the English language. After the evening performance, Mr. Daly distributes cards to all the staff with the word written on it, and instructs them to write it on walls all over the city. Thus ‘quiz’ enters the language.

1861 – Birth of Frederick Crawford. Crawford is one of the lesser known figures in Ulster Unionist history but one who was hugely influential because of his involvement in what is known as the Larne gun running incident when he was responsible for smuggling over 25,000 guns into the North on the night of 24 April 1914.

1855 – Last ever Donnybrook Fair, held in Dublin since 1204. The general uproar of the annual event results in its suspension.

1879 – A Vision of the Virgin Mary is witnessed by 15 villagers in Knock, Co. Mayo.

1882 – Birth in Gloucester of Arthur Luce, a professor of philosophy and fellow of Trinity College in Dublin for 65 years.

1911 – Irish Women’s Suffrage Federation is formed.

1920 – Birth in Belfast of Rinty Monaghan, world flyweight boxing champion.

1922 – One Free State soldier is killed in an ambush at Blessington, County Wicklow. Four more are wounded in an ambush near Enniscorthy, County Wexford. Free State troops occupy Bandon and Dunmanway, County Cork without resistance.

1959 – Death of Denis Devlin. He was, along with Samuel Beckett and Brian Coffey, one of the generation of Irish modernist poets to emerge at the end of the 1920s. He was also a career diplomat.

1970 – The Social Democratic and Labour Party is founded with Gerry Fitt as leader.

1978 – RTÉ broadcasts Eddie Macken on Boomerang winning the Aga Khan trophy.

1982 – Paul Hewson (Bono) marries his high-school sweetheart Alison Stewart at a ceremony in Raheny, Dublin.

1983 – A train from Tralee failed near Cherryville Junction and was run into from the rear by a train from Galway. Seven passengers die in the crash and and another passenger later dies from their injuries.

1998 – A salmonella alert is issued following the deaths of five elderly people in two separate outbreaks at a hospital and home for the aged in Co. Galway.

2000 – Two men are shot dead in broad daylight as an all-out war erupts between rival loyalist terror gangs in Belfast.

2000 – The Catholic hierarchy confirms it is actively considering allowing lay people to be ordained deacons in a bid to cope with the shortage of priests.

2001 – Sinn Féin warns British prime minister Tony Blair he should take note of a poll which found the vast majority of British people believe the North should no longer be part of Britain.

2001 – Unionists withhold their endorsement of the Government’s new implementation plan for future policing arrangements in Northern Ireland.

2002 – Celestica Electronics sheds half of its workforce of 500 at Swords, Co Dublin.

Photo: Blackwater Castle, Co Cork

‪#‎irish‬ ‪#‎history‬

 

Pamela

Meditation Labyrinth!

Welcome to the Fall 2014 semester.  Next time you are in the library (or you could even make a special trip over to check this out), stop by the SE corner of the 1st floor to have some fun with the Meditation Labyrinth.

What exactly is the labyrinth?

An interactive meditation labyrinth developed to facilitate meditative walking, yoga, or dancing. It is a mindfulness tool designed to counteract stress and promote wellness in computer-centric work and school environments.

Labyrinth

Users control the experience using a touch-screen device to access specific labyrinth patterns. The system contains six symbols, representing different cultures, which are explained in the labyrinth area.

For more information visit:
http://www.sparqlabyrinth.com/

 Posted by Tom R. and Garnet Nowell

Here’s to Libraries, Number Ten!

El_Escorial_SpainLocated in the heart of Spain, the Royal Library of the Monastery of El Escorial is a stunning architectural wonder (as well as a World Heritage site designation).  Built in the Herrerian style, construction began in 1563 and was completed in 1584.  The library is housed on the second floor (in the west wing) and contains nearly 45,000 documents from the 15th and 16th centuries.  The monastery is huge and contains 15 cloisters, 13 oratories, 86 staircases, 88 fountains, more than 1,600 paintings, 9 towers, and 73 sculptures.

“When you are growing up there are two institutional places that affect you most powerfully: the church, which belongs to God, and the public library, which belongs to you.”  (Keith Richards)

Source: photo courtesy of danieldalton.me  (BuzzFeed).

Posted by Tom Rink