New Materials for Education

 Come by and check out  the most recent education-related additions to the NSUBA Library:

Conley, David T. College Knowledge: What It Really Takes for Students to Succeed and What We Can Do to Get Them Ready. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2005.

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From Booklist:

The main audience for this book will be academics and educators, but parents concerned about their college-bound teens will find out a few surprising things that may help them help their kids. Conley, a professor at the University of Oregon, spent three years researching the degree to which secondary schools prepare students for higher education. His results, published in a report called “Understanding University Success,” which was distributed to every high school in the U.S., reveal that many students lack the higher-level thinking and technical skills that ensure a smooth transition to a postsecondary environment. How can educators address the disconnection? How can students prepare themselves in the meantime? Without straying too far into the language of academia, Conley addresses both questions, examining the current structure of our educational system, then providing work samples and detailed, subject-specific checklists to demonstrate the level of challenge college-bound students can expect. It’s eye-opening, to be sure, and may leave some teens longing for the comforts of high-school routine. Stephanie Zvirin
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

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Pattengale, Jerry A. The Purpose-guided Student: Dream to Succeed. Boston: McGraw Higher Education, 2010.

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From the publisher:

Jerry Pattengale’s The Purpose-Guided Student: Dream to Succeed helps students to find their way, and to be excited about doing so! Through connecting class work to life passions, Pattengale helps students to persist to graduation and beyond. The Purpose-Guided Student has a practical and engaging “big picture approach” that helps students “to create dreams stronger than their struggles,” and to develop intrinsic motivation. Engaging students in discussions about important questions relative to their future and capitalizing on the many classes and campus experiences students face, The Purpose-Guided Student motivates students find their passion and succeed in college and beyond.

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Suskie, Linda A. Assessing Student Learning: a Common Sense Guide. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2009.

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From the publisher:

The first edition of Assessing Student Learning has become the standard reference for college faculty and administrators who are charged with the task of assessing student learning within their institutions. The second edition of this landmark book offers the same practical guidance and is designed to meet ever-increasing demands for improvement and accountability. This edition includes expanded coverage of vital assessment topics such as promoting an assessment culture, characteristics of good assessment, audiences for assessment, organizing and coordinating assessment, assessing attitudes and values, setting benchmarks and standards, and using results to inform and improve teaching, learning, planning, and decision making.

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Neal, Gerald Wade. Quiet Desperation: the Effects of Competition in School on Abused and Neglected Children. Lanham: Hamilton /Rowman & Littlefield, 2008.

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From Choice:

The tone of Neal’s book reminds one of the literature of the 1970s, when educators and sociologists contrasted the performance of rich and poor students in the US. But Neal’s message is that in order to understand the nation’s students, abuse and neglect must become central to the discussion, if for no other reason than the possible impact these problems may have on 20 percent of the nation’s children. The immediate and residual effects may be far more debilitating than educators generally acknowledge. The problem is underresearched because studying children requires parental consent, a troubling conflict of interest for those who may be involved. The book appears to be partly an act of catharsis for Neal (Pfeiffer Univ.), who is quite candid about the abuse he experienced as a child. He connects his own experience to the experiences of those he has known in his careers as classroom teacher, school administrator, and university professor. His thesis is that schools neither identify well, nor respond adequately, to abuse and neglect. What is called for is a major restructuring rather than a fine-tuning of the educational system. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers through research faculty. — D. E. Tanner, California State University, Fresno

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Johnson, R. Dean. Teachable Moments: Essays on Experiential Education. Lanham, MD: University of America, 2006.

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From the publisher:

How do educators better reach their students, better capture their attention and imagination without sacrificing scholarship? Teachable Moments: Essays on Experiential Education examines the pedagogy of Prescott College, a school that has embraced experiential education and been finding success with it for over thirty years. These essays from scholars in fields as wide ranging as religious studies, environmental science, psychology, dance, literature, adventure education, and peace studies examine the challenges and, ultimately, the rewards of student-centered education.

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Levine, Donald Nathan. Powers of the Mind: the Reinvention of Liberal Learning in America. Chicago: University of Chicago, 2006.

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From Choice:

Levine, former dean of the college at the University of Chicago, provides a thoughtful, although slightly idiosyncratic argument for the importance of liberal education in American universities. The focus of the book is on the University of Chicago–an institution with a long, distinguished history of commitment to liberal education. Most of the book concerns the history and evolution of liberal education at Chicago, especially an analysis of some of the key figures involved in shaping the Chicago experience. The role of philosopher John Dewey and the university’s charismatic president Robert Maynard Hutchins are highlighted. Two of the most influential shapers of Chicago-style liberal education, Richard McKeon and Joseph Schwab, are also discussed. Levine advocates a fairly traditional idea of liberal education–a belief that American college students need to master key elements of science, social science, history, humanities, world civilization, and related themes to become “educated people” for the 21st century. This commitment, all too often forgotten in today’s academic consumerism, is worth reassessing and reiterating. The Chicago model is, of course, not the only one, but it has been influential and remains worthy of discussion. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students and faculty. — P. G. Altbach, Boston College

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Tracey, Diane H., and Lesley Mandel. Morrow. Lenses on Reading: an Introduction to Theories and Models. New York: Guilford, 2006

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From the publisher:

This accessible text provides an extensive survey of the major theories and models that influence reading instruction and research. Readers learn why theory matters in designing and implementing high-quality instruction; how to critically evaluate the assumptions and beliefs that guide their own work with students; and the benefits of approaching everyday teaching situations from multiple theoretical perspectives. Every chapter features classroom application activities and illuminating teaching vignettes. Of particular utility to graduate students, the book also addresses research applications, including descriptions of exemplary studies informed by each theoretical model.

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Deiro, Judith A., and Bonnie Benard. Teachers Do Make a Difference: the Teacher’s Guide to Connecting with Students. Thousand Oaks (California): Corwin, 2005.

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From Childhood Education:

Deiro has taken a complex topic and made it more manageable, functional, and instructive. For an institution that can be distracted by policies and procedure, this is a crucial reminder of what education really is all about.

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Isbell, Rebecca T., and Betty Exelby. Early Learning Environments That Work. Beltsville, MD: Gryphon House, 2001.

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From Young Children:

…Ideas for making environments beautiful, warm, interesting, and challenging for children.

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Mondale, Sarah, and Sarah B. Patton. School, the Story of American Public Education. Boston: Beacon, 2001.

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From School Library Journal:

Adult/High School-A direct and well-written text and the liberal use of historical photographs make School one of the few books available on the history of education in America written for the layperson. Although some earlier material is included, the bulk of the text and photographs covers the founding of a universal public-educational system in the mid to late 19th century to the inclusion battles of the early 1970s. A single flaw of this otherwise worthy book is a bias against the more bottom-line and business-oriented influences following the “America at Risk” report in the early 1980s. Those looking for a harsh critique of the American school system will not find it here. The history of alternative schooling is not included, and there’s not much coverage given to curriculum-development issues such as the phonics/whole-language debate, and other methodologies. The roughly chronological layout allows readers to trace the roots of the philosophy and rituals still surrounding the average public-school day for most students. This information will be the primary attraction for teen readers, as the whys and hows of their school day unfold beneath their fingertips. A companion book for the “School: The Story of American Public Education” documentary series on PBS television.
Sheryl Fowler, Chantilly Regional Library, VA
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

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Seaman, Don F., and Robert A. Fellenz. Effective Strategies for Teaching Adults. Columbus, Ohio ; Toronto: Merrill, 1989.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Linda Summers

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