Category Archives: Adult learners

Next Tasty Talks on Tuesday Event Slated for February 21 Featuring NSU Broken Arrow Dean Dr. Roy Wood

Did you miss out on our inaugural Tasty Talks on Tuesday” event that took place on Tuesday, January 24 from noon to 1:00 p.m. in the Visitor Center Gallery? And on the opportunity to partake of a scrumptious slice of Tom Rink’s blueberry-lavender cheesecake?

We  offered an exciting panel discussion of the Business and Technology Department’s ASSE mentoring program for our faculty members. Panelists shared insight and stories on their participation in the Environmental, Health & Safety Management degree’s mentoring program that pairs students with respected local safety and health professionals.

The session was a huge success with over a dozen in attendance! We were able to learn more about this educational, informative, and interesting mentoring program.

Hopefully, your schedule permits you the opportunity to join us for our next Tasty Talks on Tuesday event, slated for February 21st from noon to 1:00 p.m. in the Visitor Center Gallery where we will hear from NSU BA’s own Dr. Roy Wood, Dean of the campus.  So mark your calendars for this informative upcoming event that offers continued chances for cheesecake, collaboration and conversation!. Hope to see you there!

Posted by Pamela Louderback

Let’s Talk About It Oklahoma Book Discussion

The Northeastern State University Broken Arrow Library is hosting the fourth year of its Let’s Talk About It Oklahoma Book Discussions. The theme for this spring 2017 LTAIO is “Not For Children Only.”

This book discussion series revisits the classics we may have read as children and more recent examples of children’s literature. The series allows us to revisit childhood haunts by reading again the books we loved as children.

Our first book discussion took place on Wednesday, January 25 in the Administration Building Annex with NSU’s own Dr. Andrew Vassar as the event humanities scholar. Our semester-long series began with Iona Opie and Peter Opie’s “The Classic Fairy Tales” and Ethel Johnston Phelps’ “Tatterhood and Other Tales”.Prior to discussing the books, Dr. Vassar shared information on the authors and how their lives applied to our theme of “Not For Children Only“.

ltaio_012517

There are four more sessions scheduled for this semester; please consider joining us as your schedule permits. Books are available for checkout at the NSUBA library’s second floor Circulation desk. All discussion will begin at 2:30 p.m. and will conclude at 4 p.m. Light snacks will be served.

See below for times and locations for the LTAIO Book Discussion schedule:

Feb. 14 – “Little Women” – hosted by Dr. Russell Lawson, Bacone College faculty and located in the Administration Building Annex.

March 7 – “The Wind in the Willows” hosted by Dr. David Oberhelman, Oklahoma State University faculty and located in the Administration Building Annex.

March 28 – “Charlotte’s Web” and “Bridge to Terabithia” – hosted by Dr. Brian Cowlishaw, NSU faculty and located in the Administration Building in room 170.

April 18 – “Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry” and “I Am the Cheese” – hosted by Helen Clements, OSU faculty and located in the Administration Building in room 170.

For more information, please contact Pamela Louderback at 918-449-6452 or at louderba@nsuok.edu.

Posted by Pamela Louderback

Improving Self-Esteem for First-Time Online Adult Learners

As professors, we all have seen first-time students who are so nervous that they do not even know where to begin, let alone how to achieve their educational goals. Are you one of those lucky professors who works with adult students who are going back to school and are choosing to take online classes? You may find that not only do these students need help with writing an academic paper, and how to submit an assignment to a dropbox, but their self-esteem and support system are sometimes lacking.

You may wish to consider sharing the following advice in an email to your students. The result can create a more open dialogue as students learn that you care about them and will help them succeed, but also that it’s going to take hard work and ultimately they’re responsible for their learning. Adapt the following tips from Dr. Dawn Kaiser, faculty manager and online instructor for American Intercontinental University, to meet your needs and let the learning and self-esteem grow.

Dear Students:

You made the choice to get your degree and are taking classes online. Now what? It does not matter when you begin your journey, as any time you begin to reach your educational goals is the perfect time. You are looking at a long road ahead of you, and I will not lie, it will not be easy. Committing to your educational endeavor is like a lifestyle change that will take just that, a commitment, and it is a big one that will take a lot of work. However, believe me, as I am speaking from experience, when I say to you, it will be worth it!

I know you can do this and I have put my top four tips down on paper to help you get on a smart track in order to reach the finish line and walk across that stage at graduation to accept your degree.

1. Guard Against Self-Destructive Behaviors — You made the first step by applying to college, selecting a major, and getting signed up for that first class. Now, the real work begins. We all have the ability to choose our paths, to reach our goals, and build the life of our dreams. The challenge is in believing in yourself.

Next look at how your behavior, emotions, and thoughts are affecting your study habits. Are you procrastinating reading your assigned work, thinking you can just pull whatever information you need from the Internet, not starting your papers until the last minute, etc.? Examine your self-destructive behaviors. What can you do differently to be more positive and to gain the best experience out of each and every class?

2. Set Attainable Goals — What is your vision of your future? Look at next week, next month, your current class, and each class after right up to the end of your degree. Include goals for all the roles in your life. What is important in attaining those goals you have set? To make a permanent change in how you study, and balance school with the other roles in your life, you will need to set short-term goals — what is due this week? How much time do I need to set aside to complete this assignment? Then look at long-term goals, the class as a whole, and every class you need to take. Once you set your goals, continue to track them so you can see the progress you are making. Tracking your goals will keep you motivated as you check off each task you accomplish.

3. Set up a Support System — You are responsible for your own success, but we all get by with a little help from our friends and family. That is why it is important to build a healthy support system. Share your educational goals and how you are planning to accomplish them. Let others know how important this is to you to have their support. Enlist coworkers, as you never know you may find yourself a study-buddy. Do you have school-age children? Study with them. I actually spent an hour every evening with my son studying. It was a great bonding time between us, and he saw just how important learning was for the both of us. Lean on the people in your network when you feel discouraged or ready to give up due to a difficult subject, and celebrate with them when you reach your goals.

4. Ask Questions — This is your education, and you will get out of it what you put into it. Any time you find yourself struggling to figure out a specific problem, an assignment, or even just not sure what a term means, ASK. Your professors are there to help. If you do not ask, we will not know that you are struggling. We are part of your support system, and we want to see you succeed in the class just as much as you do.

Going back to school may not be easy, but with the right mindset, motivation, and support system you can do it. Believe in yourself, and your ability to learn, and you will succeed!

Posted by Pamela Louderback