Category Archives: College of Education

Faculty Council Delicious Dialogues Continue to be a Success!

The newly created Faculty Council’s “Delicious Dialogs” Monthly Faculty Research Talk & Brown Bag Lunch continues to be a great success at the Broken Arrow campus!  Delicious Dialogue is a faculty led venue where each month, a speaker is highlighted to talk about their research, or some initiative that they have undertaken.

The Faculty Council began this new monthly event in November 2014 to broaden the social space just for faculty, “Delicious Dialogs Brown Bag Lunch & Talk”. Each lunch features a faculty speaker discoursing for the first 15-20 minutes on her/his current research and/or endeavors, followed by a short Q&A session. The remainder of the hour is reserved for talking with  colleagues. Dr. Cheryl Van Den Handel, Faculty Council President notes, “the intent behind this monthly event is for faculty to share our research, and to get to know each other better.  Oftentimes, we are so busy, we don’t have the opportunity to visit with our colleagues in other departments or colleges.”

So far, in Broken Arrow, we have heard from Dr. Erik Terdal on his study abroad and summer academy opportunities at NSU, Dr. Allyson Watson who spoke about outreach engagement in the local community, and the most recent – Dr. John Mercer who spoke about the Summer Intersession class where students visit Ashland, Oregon for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.  See below for a photo of the event.

photo 2

Be sure to join us if you can for the next Delicious Dialogue on February 11 in the Visitor Center Gallery from noon to 1:00 p.m. where Dr. Martha Parrott, faculty of the College of Science and Health Professions will discuss service learning models for creating programs.

Posted by Pamela Louderback

Digital Learning Report Card — How does Oklahoma Fare?

It is said that education is our nation’s great equalizer. Ensuring the next generation of Americans has an equal opportunity to achieve success is a fundamental principle of our educational system. There are many who feel that digital learning has the potential to accomplish this important task.  Digital Learning Now! is one of those entities that espouse this philosophy.

Digital Learning Now! is a national campaign under ExcelinEd with the goal of advancing state policies that will create a high-quality digital learning environment to better equip all students with the knowledge and skills to succeed in this 21st-century economy. The policy framework stems from the belief that access to high-quality, customized learning experiences should be available to all students, unbounded by geography or artificial policy constraints.

Digital Learning Now! recently released the 2012 Digital Learning Report Card, which measures each of the nation’s 50 states against the 10 Elements of High Quality Digital Learning as it relates to K-12 education.

Image

Highlights of the report indicate that states are:

  • Advancing student-centric reforms
  • Reducing barriers to blended learning
  • Encouraging the use of technology
  • Offering a more personalized college- and career-ready education

How does Oklahoma fare?  It doesn’t look good folks! Read on for more information: This work produced a consensus around the 10 elements of high quality digital learning that identified specific issue and polices states need to address in order to support emerging next general models of learning.

Where does Oklahoma stand, you may be wondering?  Well, the state’s overall score is a 69% — that’s a D+ when combining all ten digital learning element scores.

Image

One of the most encouraging findings from Digital Learning Now’s research is that more than 700 bills involving digital learning were considered in 2012, with over 150 signed into law.  Along with DLN, it is encouraging to know that leaders in nearly every state proposed or enacted policies to advance digital learning since the release of DLN’s first state report cards in 2011.  Examples from Oklahoma include SB 1816 signed on June 8, 2012 that created the statewide Virtual Charter School Board, and SB 169.  It establishes that a virtual education provider that offers full-time virtual education to students who are not residents of the school district with which the provider is contracted shall be considered a site within each school district and subject to the state’s accountability system.

To learn more, check out the report.  Also, check out the Digital Learning Now Report Card website which features an interactive map, a tool to compare state scores and downloadable state profiles for more details on where Oklahoma stands when it comes to providing high quality digital learning.

Posted by Pamela Louderback

Welcome Karl Siewert!

IMG_0425[1]The NSU Libraries, Broken Arrow Campus, is pleased to welcome their newest faculty member, Karl Siewert.  Karl is filling the position of Instruction Librarian/Resource Coordinator to the College of Education.

Karl comes to NSU from the Tulsa City-County Library, where he has been a reference librarian for 11 years. Since 2007 he has worked with teens, but prior to that, he was focused on business reference. Karl received his MLIS from Dominican University, taking his courses through the College of St. Catherine (now St. Catherine University) in St. Paul, Minnesota. He grew up in Kansas and attended Fort Hays State University for his BS in English Education.

Karl’s reading interests include horror, fantasy, teen fiction, comics (DC more than Marvel), history and art. He considers himself a “maker,” building new things from old materials. His greatest accomplishment in that arena is a ukulele he made from an old candy tin, which he’s teaching himself to play. He also worked during library school as a professional yo-yo performer.

Welcome aboard Karl!

Posted by Tom R.

Improving Self-Esteem for First-Time Online Adult Learners

As professors, we all have seen first-time students who are so nervous that they do not even know where to begin, let alone how to achieve their educational goals. Are you one of those lucky professors who works with adult students who are going back to school and are choosing to take online classes? You may find that not only do these students need help with writing an academic paper, and how to submit an assignment to a dropbox, but their self-esteem and support system are sometimes lacking.

You may wish to consider sharing the following advice in an email to your students. The result can create a more open dialogue as students learn that you care about them and will help them succeed, but also that it’s going to take hard work and ultimately they’re responsible for their learning. Adapt the following tips from Dr. Dawn Kaiser, faculty manager and online instructor for American Intercontinental University, to meet your needs and let the learning and self-esteem grow.

Dear Students:

You made the choice to get your degree and are taking classes online. Now what? It does not matter when you begin your journey, as any time you begin to reach your educational goals is the perfect time. You are looking at a long road ahead of you, and I will not lie, it will not be easy. Committing to your educational endeavor is like a lifestyle change that will take just that, a commitment, and it is a big one that will take a lot of work. However, believe me, as I am speaking from experience, when I say to you, it will be worth it!

I know you can do this and I have put my top four tips down on paper to help you get on a smart track in order to reach the finish line and walk across that stage at graduation to accept your degree.

1. Guard Against Self-Destructive Behaviors — You made the first step by applying to college, selecting a major, and getting signed up for that first class. Now, the real work begins. We all have the ability to choose our paths, to reach our goals, and build the life of our dreams. The challenge is in believing in yourself.

Next look at how your behavior, emotions, and thoughts are affecting your study habits. Are you procrastinating reading your assigned work, thinking you can just pull whatever information you need from the Internet, not starting your papers until the last minute, etc.? Examine your self-destructive behaviors. What can you do differently to be more positive and to gain the best experience out of each and every class?

2. Set Attainable Goals — What is your vision of your future? Look at next week, next month, your current class, and each class after right up to the end of your degree. Include goals for all the roles in your life. What is important in attaining those goals you have set? To make a permanent change in how you study, and balance school with the other roles in your life, you will need to set short-term goals — what is due this week? How much time do I need to set aside to complete this assignment? Then look at long-term goals, the class as a whole, and every class you need to take. Once you set your goals, continue to track them so you can see the progress you are making. Tracking your goals will keep you motivated as you check off each task you accomplish.

3. Set up a Support System — You are responsible for your own success, but we all get by with a little help from our friends and family. That is why it is important to build a healthy support system. Share your educational goals and how you are planning to accomplish them. Let others know how important this is to you to have their support. Enlist coworkers, as you never know you may find yourself a study-buddy. Do you have school-age children? Study with them. I actually spent an hour every evening with my son studying. It was a great bonding time between us, and he saw just how important learning was for the both of us. Lean on the people in your network when you feel discouraged or ready to give up due to a difficult subject, and celebrate with them when you reach your goals.

4. Ask Questions — This is your education, and you will get out of it what you put into it. Any time you find yourself struggling to figure out a specific problem, an assignment, or even just not sure what a term means, ASK. Your professors are there to help. If you do not ask, we will not know that you are struggling. We are part of your support system, and we want to see you succeed in the class just as much as you do.

Going back to school may not be easy, but with the right mindset, motivation, and support system you can do it. Believe in yourself, and your ability to learn, and you will succeed!

Posted by Pamela Louderback

Welcome to Our New Librarian!

Join me in welcoming the newest librarian to the NSU-BA campus . . . Stephanie Ingold, who is the new Instruction Librarian/Resource Coordinator/Liaison to the College of Education on the Broken Arrow campus.  Stephanie comes to us from Rogers State University where she worked with acquisitions.  Additionally, she brings with her a wealth of classroom teaching experience as well from her time in New York where she was the head library media specialist for 11 years at Thomas A. Edison High School in Elmira Heights, New York.

Welcome aboard Steph!

Posted by Tom R.

Free Screening & Discussion of Waiting for Superman

Northeastern State University’s Center for Teaching & Learning will host two screenings of the documentary Waiting for Superman in early March. All those interested in the education of American students are invited to attend and join in a discussion of the issues it brings up.

NSU President Don Betz suggests that this film (and one shown last month–Race to Nowhere) would be excellent vehicles to begin a collaborative campus/community conversation about the future of education and our role in it. Thus far, he has been correct in his assessment, as the first film was well attended and has resulted in positive community conversations and collaborations.

Each event is free and open to the public. No reservations are required.

The first screening will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, March 7th in the Webb Auditorium on the Tahlequah campus.

The second screening will begin at 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 10th in the Broken Arrow Auditorium on the Broken Arrow campus.

Following the 102-minute movie, administrators and educators will join in a discussion of the realities and potential reform of contemporary education.

According to the director, Waiting for Superman is a “deeply personal exploration of the current state of public education in the U.S. and how it is affecting our children.” The film has been nominated for and won numerous awards for best documentary, including the Academy Awards, Critics’ Choice, and Sundance.

For more information about Waiting for Superman, visit http://www.waitingforsuperman.com/

For more information about the NSU screenings and discussions contact Linda Summers (summerla@nsuok.edu or x6455) or Chuck Ziehr (ziehr@nsuok.edu or x2065).

Free Presentation by Award-winning Illustrator

*Image accessed via Chris Soentpiet website

Award-winning book illustrator Chris Soentpiet will speak on Friday, June 18th from 7:00pm – 8:30pm in the BA Campus Auditorium. The event is free and open to all who would like to hear him speak about writing and illustrating. 

For more information contact Dr. Barbara Ray raybj@nsuok.edu.

Posted by Linda Summers