Category Archives: NSU-BA Collection

It’s Constitution Week. Help Us Celebrate!

 

We are celebrating Constitution Week 2017 here at the NSU-BA Library. Stop by the Library and view our displays.

Our whiteboard table is set up in the 2nd-floor hallway with questions about the Bill of Rights and the Constitution for students to answer; then step into the Library and view our Constitution Week Book display.

You can even pick up a book or two to read. I decided to read Alexander Hamilton since I have been listening to the soundtrack from the Broadway Musical. And let me tell you the book is as intriguing as the Musical. I think you will like both the book and the music. If Hamilton is not at the top of your reading list, there are more books from which to choose. How about Common Sense by Thomas Paine or 1776 by David McCullough? We also have several books on the Constitution.

Looking forward to seeing you here at the NSU-BA Library. It’s also a great time to visit the Genealogical Materials on the 1st-floor. Need help? Ask any one of our awesome librarians.

 

Advertisements

Temperature Reaches Triple Digits

The temperature is supposed to reach 104 degree this afternoon and there is no sign of it cooling down soon.  So if you are sitting at home thinking of things to do to keep cool, why not come in and check-out a DVD. We have just received several new additions to our collection. Here are a few to preview:

The Trail of Tears

From: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0114714/

The trail of tears –explores America’s darkest period: President Andrew Jackson’s Indian Removal Act of 1830 and the forced removal of the Cherokee Nation to Oklahoma in 1838. Nearly a quarter of the Cherokee National died during the Trail of Tears, arriving in Indian Territory with few elders and even fewer children. Presented by Wes Studi and narrated by James Earl Jones.

We Shall Remain

From: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/weshallremain/

“They were charismatic and forward thinking, imaginative and courageous, compassionate and resolute, and, at times, arrogant, vengeful and reckless. For hundreds of years, Native American leaders from Massasoit, Tecumseh, and Tenskwatawa, to Major Ridge, Geronimo, and Fools Crow valiantly resisted expulsion from their lands and fought the extinction of their culture. Sometimes, their strategies were militaristic, but more often they were diplomatic, spiritual, legal and political … These five documentaries spanning almost four hundred years tell the story of pivotal moments in U.S. history from the Native American perspective, upending two-dimensional stereotypes of American Indians as simply ferocious warriors or peaceable lovers of the land”

As You Like It

Rosalind, the daughter of Duke Senior (the banished duke), is raised at the court of Duke Frederick (who is younger brother to Duke Senior and took over his dukedom), with her cousin Celia (daughter to Duke Frederick). She falls in love with a young man named Orlando, but before she can even think twice about it, she is banished by Duke Frederick, who threatens death if she comes near the court again. Celia, being Rosalind’s best friend, goes with Rosalind (who is disguised as a boy, Ganymede) and Touchstone, the court’s fool, to the Forest of Arden. Upon their arrival in the forest, they happen upon Orlando and his manservant, who are fleeing the wrath of Orlando’s eldest brother. What follows is an elaborate scheme devised by the cross-dressing Rosalind to find out the verity of Orlando’s supposed passion for her, and to further capture his heart, through the witty and mischievous façade of Ganymede.

Trojan War

From: http://www.history.com/

Wood started in Berlin where some artifacts from Troy remained after the devastation of World War II. From there he traveled to the Mediterranean, Turkey, and Wales to explore how much truth was in the oral story told by Homer in the Iliad. Even for non-archeology buffs, Wood brings to life the heartbreak and duplicity of Schliemann, the first to excavate (and possibly destroy portions of) Troy. This is followed by Wilhelm Dörpfeld, Schliemann’s heir, who explored further around the site, exposing what might be the Troy described by Homer. Thirdly discussed is the influential Britan, Arthur Evans, who unearthed Minos at Minos at Knossos. Lastly, we learn about Carl Blagan, an American who extracted further evidence from Troy.

Podcasting in the Classroom

From: http://www.carmelinafilms.com/index.php

Kids are especially heavy users of this technology. They love to hear their favorite songs everywhere they go. So if kids are already using the technology needed for Podcasting, why not use it to help students learn better? There are a lot of ways podcasts can be used to help improve learning in, and outside of the classroom. This title discusses the various ways in which podcasting can be used by educators to make learning more fun and relevant to students. It includes several strategies and techniques that will help improve literacy, verbal and social abilities, and creativity.

Blogging in the Classroom

From: http://www.carmelinafilms.com/index.php

In today’s technology-laden world, the public has an opportunity to respond to news and world events through the use of the internet, but also create news themselves. This can be done easily and at no cost through the use of blogs. Blogs are like internet newspapers or journals that we can update any time and post our thoughts about the world. But blogs are so much more than just newspapers. This title discusses the various ways in which blogging can be used by educators to make learning more fun and relevant to students. It includes several strategies and techniques that will help improve literacy, verbal and social abilities, and creativity.

A Class Divided

From: http://books.google.com/

This PBS program looks at how discrimination affects both those who are treated unfairly and those who try to take advantage of people they do not feel deserve their respect. Shortly after Martin Luther King Jr., was killed, a teacher in Iowa decided to run an experiment to help her students learn more about how discrimination negatively affects everyone. She chose to treat some of her students far better than others, based solely on physical traits. This show looks at what this experiment taught the children and how they continue to be affected by it years later. The program received an Emmy Award, a Sidney Hillman Prize Award, and other honors for how it explored this unique lesson in ethics and humanity.

Brown eyes, Blue Eyes

From: http://www.globalinclusionstrategies.com/about.html

The Facilitator Guide prepares you to handle the emotionally charged group dynamics that necessarily surface with the topic of biases, stereotypes, and assumptions. While the videos are powerful and informative, they are only the starting point. It is the discussion among participants before and after the video that solidifies learning and transfers new knowledge and insights back to the workplace. With twelve workshop options, a wealth of information on workplace diversity, tips on managing group dynamics, a full-color slide show and participant guides, this product is both flexible and comprehensive.

Skins

From: http://www.fandango.com

Rudy (Eric Schweig) and Mogie (Graham Greene) are two brothers living on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Located in the poorest county in the United States, joblessness and alcoholism are all-too-common facts of life in Pine Ridge, and Rudy and Mogie represent opposite ends of the scale of fortune. Mogie, a Vietnam veteran who came home emotionally scarred by the war, has a severe drinking problem and can’t relate to his teenage son Herbie (Noah Watts), while Mogie’s younger brother Rudy has struggled to better himself, and as a law enforcement officer is a respected member of the Pine Ridge community. But while Rudy is determined to do something positive for his town, he feels there’s only so much he can do as a lawman, and in his off-hours he’s become a vigilante, roughing up people whom he believes are helping to bring down Pine Ridge, and plotting to blow up a nearby liquor store that profits from the widespread alcoholism that has destroyed the lives of so many of his people, including his brother.

The Good German

From: http://www.starpulse.com/

Berlin, July, 1945. Journalist Jake Geismer arrives to cover the Potsdam conference, issued a captain’s uniform for easier passage. He also wants to find Lena, an old flame who’s now a prostitute desperate to get out of Berlin. He discovers that the driver he’s assigned, a cheerful down-home sadist named Corporal Tully, is Lena’s keeper. When the body of a murdered man washes up in Potsdam (within the Russian sector), Jake may be the only person who wants to solve the crime: U.S. personnel are busy finding Nazis to bring to trial, the Russians and the Americans are looking for German rocket scientists, and Lena has her own secrets.

Posted by Pamela Louderback

New Materials for Education

 Come by and check out  the most recent education-related additions to the NSUBA Library:

Conley, David T. College Knowledge: What It Really Takes for Students to Succeed and What We Can Do to Get Them Ready. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2005.

_____________

From Booklist:

The main audience for this book will be academics and educators, but parents concerned about their college-bound teens will find out a few surprising things that may help them help their kids. Conley, a professor at the University of Oregon, spent three years researching the degree to which secondary schools prepare students for higher education. His results, published in a report called “Understanding University Success,” which was distributed to every high school in the U.S., reveal that many students lack the higher-level thinking and technical skills that ensure a smooth transition to a postsecondary environment. How can educators address the disconnection? How can students prepare themselves in the meantime? Without straying too far into the language of academia, Conley addresses both questions, examining the current structure of our educational system, then providing work samples and detailed, subject-specific checklists to demonstrate the level of challenge college-bound students can expect. It’s eye-opening, to be sure, and may leave some teens longing for the comforts of high-school routine. Stephanie Zvirin
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

_____________

 

Pattengale, Jerry A. The Purpose-guided Student: Dream to Succeed. Boston: McGraw Higher Education, 2010.

_____________

From the publisher:

Jerry Pattengale’s The Purpose-Guided Student: Dream to Succeed helps students to find their way, and to be excited about doing so! Through connecting class work to life passions, Pattengale helps students to persist to graduation and beyond. The Purpose-Guided Student has a practical and engaging “big picture approach” that helps students “to create dreams stronger than their struggles,” and to develop intrinsic motivation. Engaging students in discussions about important questions relative to their future and capitalizing on the many classes and campus experiences students face, The Purpose-Guided Student motivates students find their passion and succeed in college and beyond.

_____________

Suskie, Linda A. Assessing Student Learning: a Common Sense Guide. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2009.

_____________

From the publisher:

The first edition of Assessing Student Learning has become the standard reference for college faculty and administrators who are charged with the task of assessing student learning within their institutions. The second edition of this landmark book offers the same practical guidance and is designed to meet ever-increasing demands for improvement and accountability. This edition includes expanded coverage of vital assessment topics such as promoting an assessment culture, characteristics of good assessment, audiences for assessment, organizing and coordinating assessment, assessing attitudes and values, setting benchmarks and standards, and using results to inform and improve teaching, learning, planning, and decision making.

_____________

Neal, Gerald Wade. Quiet Desperation: the Effects of Competition in School on Abused and Neglected Children. Lanham: Hamilton /Rowman & Littlefield, 2008.

_____________

From Choice:

The tone of Neal’s book reminds one of the literature of the 1970s, when educators and sociologists contrasted the performance of rich and poor students in the US. But Neal’s message is that in order to understand the nation’s students, abuse and neglect must become central to the discussion, if for no other reason than the possible impact these problems may have on 20 percent of the nation’s children. The immediate and residual effects may be far more debilitating than educators generally acknowledge. The problem is underresearched because studying children requires parental consent, a troubling conflict of interest for those who may be involved. The book appears to be partly an act of catharsis for Neal (Pfeiffer Univ.), who is quite candid about the abuse he experienced as a child. He connects his own experience to the experiences of those he has known in his careers as classroom teacher, school administrator, and university professor. His thesis is that schools neither identify well, nor respond adequately, to abuse and neglect. What is called for is a major restructuring rather than a fine-tuning of the educational system. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers through research faculty. — D. E. Tanner, California State University, Fresno

_____________

Johnson, R. Dean. Teachable Moments: Essays on Experiential Education. Lanham, MD: University of America, 2006.

_____________

From the publisher:

How do educators better reach their students, better capture their attention and imagination without sacrificing scholarship? Teachable Moments: Essays on Experiential Education examines the pedagogy of Prescott College, a school that has embraced experiential education and been finding success with it for over thirty years. These essays from scholars in fields as wide ranging as religious studies, environmental science, psychology, dance, literature, adventure education, and peace studies examine the challenges and, ultimately, the rewards of student-centered education.

_____________

Levine, Donald Nathan. Powers of the Mind: the Reinvention of Liberal Learning in America. Chicago: University of Chicago, 2006.

_____________

From Choice:

Levine, former dean of the college at the University of Chicago, provides a thoughtful, although slightly idiosyncratic argument for the importance of liberal education in American universities. The focus of the book is on the University of Chicago–an institution with a long, distinguished history of commitment to liberal education. Most of the book concerns the history and evolution of liberal education at Chicago, especially an analysis of some of the key figures involved in shaping the Chicago experience. The role of philosopher John Dewey and the university’s charismatic president Robert Maynard Hutchins are highlighted. Two of the most influential shapers of Chicago-style liberal education, Richard McKeon and Joseph Schwab, are also discussed. Levine advocates a fairly traditional idea of liberal education–a belief that American college students need to master key elements of science, social science, history, humanities, world civilization, and related themes to become “educated people” for the 21st century. This commitment, all too often forgotten in today’s academic consumerism, is worth reassessing and reiterating. The Chicago model is, of course, not the only one, but it has been influential and remains worthy of discussion. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students and faculty. — P. G. Altbach, Boston College

_____________

 

Tracey, Diane H., and Lesley Mandel. Morrow. Lenses on Reading: an Introduction to Theories and Models. New York: Guilford, 2006

_____________

From the publisher:

This accessible text provides an extensive survey of the major theories and models that influence reading instruction and research. Readers learn why theory matters in designing and implementing high-quality instruction; how to critically evaluate the assumptions and beliefs that guide their own work with students; and the benefits of approaching everyday teaching situations from multiple theoretical perspectives. Every chapter features classroom application activities and illuminating teaching vignettes. Of particular utility to graduate students, the book also addresses research applications, including descriptions of exemplary studies informed by each theoretical model.

_____________

Deiro, Judith A., and Bonnie Benard. Teachers Do Make a Difference: the Teacher’s Guide to Connecting with Students. Thousand Oaks (California): Corwin, 2005.

_____________

From Childhood Education:

Deiro has taken a complex topic and made it more manageable, functional, and instructive. For an institution that can be distracted by policies and procedure, this is a crucial reminder of what education really is all about.

_____________

Isbell, Rebecca T., and Betty Exelby. Early Learning Environments That Work. Beltsville, MD: Gryphon House, 2001.

_____________

From Young Children:

…Ideas for making environments beautiful, warm, interesting, and challenging for children.

_____________


Mondale, Sarah, and Sarah B. Patton. School, the Story of American Public Education. Boston: Beacon, 2001.

_____________

From School Library Journal:

Adult/High School-A direct and well-written text and the liberal use of historical photographs make School one of the few books available on the history of education in America written for the layperson. Although some earlier material is included, the bulk of the text and photographs covers the founding of a universal public-educational system in the mid to late 19th century to the inclusion battles of the early 1970s. A single flaw of this otherwise worthy book is a bias against the more bottom-line and business-oriented influences following the “America at Risk” report in the early 1980s. Those looking for a harsh critique of the American school system will not find it here. The history of alternative schooling is not included, and there’s not much coverage given to curriculum-development issues such as the phonics/whole-language debate, and other methodologies. The roughly chronological layout allows readers to trace the roots of the philosophy and rituals still surrounding the average public-school day for most students. This information will be the primary attraction for teen readers, as the whys and hows of their school day unfold beneath their fingertips. A companion book for the “School: The Story of American Public Education” documentary series on PBS television.
Sheryl Fowler, Chantilly Regional Library, VA
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

_____________

Seaman, Don F., and Robert A. Fellenz. Effective Strategies for Teaching Adults. Columbus, Ohio ; Toronto: Merrill, 1989.

 

 

 

 

Posted by Linda Summers